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  • Welcome

    We are excited to present our new responsive website to Rhode Island. Here you will find information on various topics related to domestic violence and the work we are doing to end it. The site is designed to provide resources to individuals experiencing abuse so that they can get the help they need. It is also a valuable tool for people who want to help and for those who want to get involved. Check back often for updates, and share your feedback with us so that we can better serve you.

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  • Member Agencies

    The RICADV's six local domestic violence agencies provide a wide array of services for victims, including 24-hour hotline support, emergency shelter, support groups, counseling services, and assistance with the legal system. For more information about these organizations and services, call the statewide Helpline at 800-494-8100 or click below. If you see or hear someone being hurt, call 911 immediately.

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  • Latino Outreach

    Oprima el botón “Read More” para acceder a nuestro sitio web en Español.

    At the RICADV, we proactively serve the Latino community, collaborating with Rhode Island businesses to further our reach to those experiencing abuse. During our public awareness campaigns, we have partnered with Telemundo, Providence en Español, and Latina 100.3 FM to help Latino communities know that help is available through our member agencies. Each agency offers diverse programs and services that can include safety planning, court advocacy, shelter, and support groups. Immigration help is also available. Access our website in Spanish by clicking the "Read More" button below or En Español at the top of this page.

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  • Communities Can Help

    Last October, we launched our KNOW MORE. DO MORE. campaign in recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM). Our goal was to help different sectors of the community – including health care, the workplace, faith, and Latino communities – take action to end domestic violence. When communities take a stand as leaders on this issue, individuals are more likely to have the support they need to act. That's when we'll see real change in Rhode Island. That's how we'll put a stop to domestic violence. Learn more about our 2014 campaign by clicking below.

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  • We Give Support.

    As coworkers, employers, businesses and organizations, we have the ability to help those experiencing domestic violence. The workplace often serves as a location where abusers can readily access their victims, and relationship abuse can greatly impact victims' job performance in other ways, too; for instance, victims lose an estimated 8 million days of paid work each year due to domestic violence, the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs. These problems only serve to exacerbate the financial abuse that occurs in 98% of abusive relationships. An easy way to begin creating a safe workplace environment is to display materials on domestic violence in visible, accessible areas. Click below to view DVAM 2014 posters that you can hang in your office.

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  • We Listen.

    Health care providers are often the first to learn about the domestic violence that their patients may be experiencing and are in a unique position to help prevent future abuse. Listening to patients is a critical first step. During DVAM 2014, the RICADV connected with members of Rhode Island's health care community to help them know more about the steps they can take to address domestic violence. We partnered with the Rhode Island Medical Society, which published an article written by RICADV staff in the October issue of Rhode Island Medical Journal. View the article by clicking below.

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The Newsroom

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Latest News


Ten Men Launches June Public Awareness Campaign as National Leader
in the Work to Prevent Domestic Violence through Men’s Engagement


Ten Men expands RI presence in 2015, the third year of a program funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Radio and broadcast public service announcements will air throughout the month
on WEEI, WHJY, Pandora, and local TV networks


[Providence, RI – June 18, 2015] Following a year where domestic violence made national headlines – and the importance of healthy masculinity commanded the country’s attention in unprecedented ways – Ten Men has launched its 2015 Father’s Day public awareness campaign, inviting Rhode Island men to play a part in preventing domestic violence.

Ten Men’s television public service announcement will air on local networks throughout the month, while the group’s radio public service announcement will air in English on 94 WHJY, 103.7 WEEI, and Pandora and in Spanish on Latina 100.3FM.

The campaign arrives just in time for Father’s Day, calling RI men to think about how they use their voice and how they influence others. Everyone is a role model for certain people in their lives, which means everyone has the ability to help create a world without domestic violence.

Read More: Latest News

NFL Players and League Act to End Domestic Violence

By Linda Impagliazzo
Executive Director, Blackstone Valley Advocacy Center

 

Football. The wait is over. And there's no better example than this October 13-14 weekend, as the New England Pats took on Seattle and Buffalo competed against Arizona.

With the new season of the NFL in full gear, it is difficult not to think about the still-recent domestic violence arrest of Chad (Ochocinco) Johnson. I applaud the Miami Dolphins for terminating his contract as a sign that domestic violence is not acceptable in the NFL, and I commend others in the league for taking a stand. Two examples are Jason Witten of the Dallas Cowboys and William Gay of the Arizona Cardinals – and former Pittsburgh Steeler.

Many NFL players have experienced the impact of violence in the home themselves and are deeply and detrimentally affected. But these players have had the courage to tell their stories to help others.

Jason Witten: Child Witness

Witten is aware of what it is like to grow up in an abusive home; he remembers his mother leaving a domestic violence situation when he was 11 years old. At the time, his mother and two brothers fled to live with his grandparents. Jason says he was fortunate to have his grandfather as a positive role model who introduced him to football, and he now makes it his mission to help children like him who have witnessed domestic violence.

Witten started The Jason Witten SCORE Foundation which places male mentors in domestic violence shelters. The mentors seek to demonstrate positive male behavior to children in order to break the cycle of violence. He also started a prevention program in high schools in Texas called "Coaching Boys into Men," which trains coaches to educate their players on the dangers of dating violence.

William Gay: Losing A Parent

Another player making a difference is Gay of the Cardinals, who is featured in a video produced by the Women's Center & Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh. Gay's mother's life was tragically cut short by a man who claimed to have loved her; the video is a moving and courageous account of Will's early life and the role that the homicide of a parent by an intimate partner played in altering his childhood and life. In sharing his own personal tragedy, the audience is left with the sense that Gay relives the pain of his upbringing in order to help others who may be witnessing or experiencing a similar situation.

NFL: Taking a Stand

Apart from individual players, how is the NFL helping to end domestic violence? In an interview with CBSSports.com this past August, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell outlined some of the areas of the the current personal conduct policy that he and the players' union want to put in place, including a section dealing with domestic violence and a clause about players and league employees: anyone "convicted of a domestic violence attack can be subject to fines and suspension." The NFL expects its players and employees to be role models for the many fans, and the idea that domestic violence is part of the league's personal conduct policy is a good demonstration of their commitment.

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So, as the football season continues, let's join together with Jason Witten, William Gay and others in the NFL who are working with the community to stop violence against women, and making a difference in the lives of families affected by domestic violence.

Blog postings and user comments reflect the opinions of the responsible contributor only, and do not reflect the viewpoint of the Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence does not endorse or guarantee the accuracy of any posting. The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence accepts no obligation to review every posting, but reserves the right (but not the obligation) to delete postings that may be considered offensive, illegal or inappropriate.

Communications Center

  • Communicating our work to end DV is vital +

    Communicating the work to end domestic violence is vital. Visit our Communications Center and The Newsroom to KNOW MORE. Read More
  • Public Awareness +

    Raising awareness to end domestic violence is part of our mission. Learn how we keep the issue visible in our communities. Read More
  • Handbook for Journalists +

    The media can help break the silence and educate the public. Visit our online guide for journalists covering domestic violence.
    Read More
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Site Search

Teen Center

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KNOW MORE: Relationship abuse happens among teens, too. Visit our Teen Center during the launch of Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month in February 2015 for interactive tools!

Spotlight

  • Be Tech Safe
  • News & Events
  • 35 Years of Progress
  • AmazonSmile

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Your abuser may monitor your Internet use and may be able to view your computer activity.

To immediately leave our site and redirect to a different site, click on the box to the bottom-right of our website or hit the ESC (Escape) key on the upper-left of your keyboard.

If you feel that your computer is not secure, use a computer in another location that your abuser cannot access.

For more information and tips for staying safe online and on your devices, click "Read More" to visit the Privacy & Technology section of our website.

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Looking to get involved in the movement to end domestic violence
or just want to KNOW MORE?

Visit our Calendar of Events to find a myriad of local and
social media events.

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spotlight image lisaleslie35th Anniversary Celebration

In 2014, the RICADV celebrated 35 years of progress in advocating for victims and holding abusers accountable.

On October 9, during Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we commemorated this milestone with special guest Lisa Leslie, WNBA legend, four-time Olympic gold medalist, and supporter of the national NO MORE campaign against domestic violence.

We thank everyone who has played a part in helping us move our work forward. Together we can end domestic violence.

Visit our 35th anniversary page to watch a special video, view photos of the event (coming soon!), and more.

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AmazonSmile-webWhat is AmazonSmile?

AmazonSmile is a simple and automatic way for you to support the RICADV every time you shop, at no cost to you. When you shop at http://smile.amazon.com, you'll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to the RICADV.

On your first visit to AmazonSmile, you need to select a charitable organization to receive donations from eligible purchases before you begin shopping. Choose the RI Coalition Against Domestic Violence to support us. Amazon will remember your selection, and then every eligible purchase you make on AmazonSmile will result in a donation.

About the RICADV

The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence (RICADV) is an organization dedicated to ending domestic violence. We were formed in 1979 to support and assist the six domestic violence prevention agencies in Rhode Island. We provide leadership to our member agencies, strive to create justice for victims, and raise awareness on the issue of domestic violence in Rhode Island.

Member Agencies

The RICADV's six local domestic violence agencies provide a wide array of services for victims, including 24-hour hotline support, emergency shelter, support groups, counseling services, and assistance with the legal system. For more information about these organizations and services, call the statewide Helpline at 800-494-8100 or click here. If you hear or see someone being hurt, call 911 immediately.

 

Contact Details

422 Post Road, Suite 102
Warwick, RI 02888-1539

T (401) 467-9940

F (401) 467-9943