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  • Get Off the Bench!

    Get Off the Bench!

    October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Our statewide public awareness campaign "Get Off the Bench!" features URI student athletes saying NO MORE to dating and domestic violence. This October, be on the lookout for the campaign on RIPTA buses, PANDORA, and at the Dunkin Donuts Center. Domestic violence impacts all of us, and will take all of us, together, to end it. How will you “get off the bench”? How will you play your part?
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  • Behind Closed Doors

    Behind Closed Doors

    **TICKETS ARE SOLD OUT** To inquire about the waiting list, please contact Shannon Cordeiro at shannon@ricadv.org.** Do not miss the final performance of Behind Closed Doors at Trinity Repertory Company this October, National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Behind Closed Doors is an original play written and performed by 15 survivors of domestic violence from SOAR, Sisters Overcoming Abusive Relationships, a task force of the RICADV. The performance is a true account of their experiences with domestic violence, hope, and survival, seeking to draw you into their lives to dispel the stigmas of this often misunderstood abuse.
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  • Ten Men Summit

    Ten Men Summit

    Rhode Island men, you're invited to the 3rd annual Ten Men Summit on Thursday, October 27, hosted by Providence College! This event is designed for men and led by men who want to play an active role in preventing domestic violence in our communities. All individuals who identify as male are welcome. Come be a part of the conversation about how men can help prevent violence against women and girls. The event is free to attend! Doors open at 5:00 p.m. A complimentary dinner will be provided, thanks to our generous host and sponsor Providence College. To register, visit http://bit.ly/TenMenSummit.
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  • New Resource for RI

    New Resource for RI

    Now more than ever, people are becoming aware of and outraged by the harmful impacts of domestic violence. With primary prevention, we can stop the violence before it happens in the first place, before people ever become victims or perpetrators of abuse. To learn more, check out this new resource created by the RICADV!
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  • "The Way Home" Charm

    Alex and Ani has partnered with the RICADV and the National Network To End Domestic Violence to launch the CHARITY BY DESIGN charm bangle “The Way Home.” When you purchase your bracelets through the RICADV, 50% of the proceeds go toward supporting our work to end domestic violence in RI. You can purchase bracelets in person at the RICADV’s office in Warwick Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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  • Latino Outreach

    Latino Outreach

    Oprima el botón “Read More” para acceder a nuestro sitio web en Español.

    At the RICADV, we proactively serve Latino communities and work to raise awareness about the help that is available through our member agencies. Each agency offers diverse programs and services that can include safety planning, court advocacy, shelter, and support groups. Immigration help is also available. Access our website in Spanish by clicking the "Read More" button below or En Español at the top of this page.

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The Newsroom

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Latest News

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Statement Regarding the Domestic Violence Homicide of Andres Arguijo Acosta

We were deeply saddened to learn about the homicide of Andres Arguijo Acosta, a 33-year-old Providence man who was murdered by his girlfriend’s ex-boyfriend on Saturday morning. Our sympathies go out to his family and friends, especially his girlfriend and his three children. Andres’ death is the seventh domestic violence murder in Rhode Island in 2016, and the second in as many days in Providence.
 
Rhode Island law only recognizes domestic violence in crimes that occur between those directly involved in an abusive relationship, but the Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence tracks any homicide incident where domestic violence leads to the loss of life in Rhode Island communities, including cases in which bystanders and children are killed.
 
It is important to recognize that abuse does not only affect the victim; abusers often target bystanders – especially family members, pets, or new dating partners – in order to exert power and control over their victim. Harming or killing someone who is loved by the victim is domestic violence. There is no way around this fact, and we cannot hold back on calling this horrific act what it is – a domestic violence murder.
 
. . .

Read More: Latest News

Family Court should champion children's safety

By Deborah DeBare
Providence Journal. July 24, 2010.

During the last few months, the Rhode Island Family Court opened the door for new solutions that could provide greater safety for victims of domestic violence and their children. In its search for a new Family Court chief judge, the State of Rhode Island must weigh numerous credentials. In order to build upon the crucial work that Judge Jeremiah Jeremiah initiated this year, one of the top qualifications for the next chief judge must be a commitment to champion our children’s safety. 

In March, the Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence and its task force of survivors, Sisters Overcoming Abusive Relationships (SOAR), released the results of the two-year-long Child Custody and Visitation Solutions Project, in a report called “Safety for Children” (www.ricadv.org/public-policy/101-safetyforchildren.html). The project examined Rhode Island’s Family Court system through different perspectives, assessed the needs of survivors of domestic violence and their children, and proposed 12 public-policy recommendations to strengthen safety for victims and their children.

From the surveys of 101 survivors, 204 case reviews, four focus groups and several interviews with key informants, the report found that during the custody and visitation process victims of domestic violence continue to suffer abuse, children suffer abuse and victims and their children face devastating financial impacts.

Many of the survivors reported that on many occasions they were followed, harassed, threatened and assaulted, even with a valid restraining order — in some cases, even in the courthouse. Much of the time, the history of abuse was minimized by the court. As one survivor put it, “I feel like the court dismissed my concerns about the safety and did not take them seriously, despite the fact that he has a very well-documented history of violent behavior.”

When this continued abuse is minimized, those survivors with children have even greater concerns. As one survivor surveyed stated, “I lived in a house with a man who threatened to kill me so many times I lost track, and I was having to hand my 4- or 5-year-old child over to him to go on visitation. .?.?. That was unsafe.” Another survivor, frustrated by the danger to her children’s well-being, reported in a survey, “They [the children] feel like they are walking on egg shells.”

Finally, the fairness of a system that is set up to protect people comes into question when survivors of domestic violence and their children seek a way out of an abusive household only to face major financial barriers to resources they need, finding themselves in legal debt and ultimately faced with poverty. Over three-quarters of the survivors interviewed made less than $35,000 a year. A third of those paid over $25,000 in legal fees.

These stories reveal the need to prioritize safety in Rhode Island’s custody and visitation process. On June 18, Judge Jeremiah opened the door to children’s safety by closing the Rhode Island Family Court for a special training session led by nationally renowned author Lundy Bancroft and me. The training was designed to increase judicial awareness of the ongoing impact of domestic violence and the court system on victims of domestic violence and their children and was the first of the 12 recommendations from the coalition’s report to be implemented.

The next Family Court chief judge can immediately build on this work by implementing three other policies:

•?Implement court protocols that ensure the safety of victims and their children in custody and visitation cases.

•?Use statutes and policies to prevent abusers from using the court system to further victimize domestic violence victims and their children.

•?Strengthen domestic-violence education for professionals who are involved in the custody and visitation process, including, but not limited to, mediators, guardians ad litem, those in the Family Court investigative unit, supervised facilitators and mental health professionals.

In their search for the next Family Court chief judge, we hope that Governor Carcieri and his team will strive to identify someone who will put safety first for victims of domestic violence and their children. Rhode Island needs a Family Court champion for children’s safety.

Deborah DeBare is the executive director of the Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

Communications Center

  • Handbook for Journalists +

    We work with the Rhode Island media to increase awareness about domestic violence, the services and resources available, and the ways the community can get involved. The press can help break the silence and educate the public. Visit the RICADV's "Online Guide for Journalists" for best practices on covering domestic violence.
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  • Public Awareness Campaigns +

    Public awareness campaigns are one way we can keep the issue of domestic violence visible, provide information about community resources, and engage all Rhode Islanders as active bystanders.
    Read More
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Site Search

Teen Center

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Relationship abuse impacts young people, too. Visit our Teen Center to find resources and information for young people in RI.

Spotlight

  • Be Tech Safe
  • News & Events
  • 35 Years of Progress
  • AmazonSmile

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Your abuser may monitor your Internet use and may be able to view your computer activity.

To immediately leave our site and redirect to a different site, click on the box to the bottom-right of our website or hit the ESC (Escape) key on the upper-left of your keyboard.

If you feel that your computer is not secure, use a computer in another location that your abuser cannot access.

For more information and tips for staying safe online and on your devices, click "Read More" to visit the Privacy & Technology section of our website.

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Looking to get involved in the movement to end domestic violence?

Visit our Calendar of Events to find local and
online events.

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spotlight image lisaleslie35th Anniversary Celebration

In 2014, the RICADV celebrated 35 years of progress in advocating for victims and holding abusers accountable.

On October 9, during Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we commemorated this milestone with special guest Lisa Leslie, WNBA legend, four-time Olympic gold medalist, and supporter of the national NO MORE campaign against domestic violence.

We thank everyone who has played a part in helping us move our work forward. Together we can end domestic violence.

Visit our 35th anniversary page to watch a special video, view photos of the event (coming soon!), and more.

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AmazonSmile-webWhat is AmazonSmile?

AmazonSmile is a simple and automatic way for you to support the RICADV every time you shop, at no cost to you. When you shop at http://smile.amazon.com, you'll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to the RICADV.

On your first visit to AmazonSmile, you need to select a charitable organization to receive donations from eligible purchases before you begin shopping. Choose the RI Coalition Against Domestic Violence to support us. Amazon will remember your selection, and then every eligible purchase you make on AmazonSmile will result in a donation.

About the RICADV

The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence (RICADV) is an organization dedicated to ending domestic violence. We were formed in 1979 to support and assist the domestic violence agencies in Rhode Island. We provide leadership to our member agencies, strive to create justice for victims, and raise awareness on the issue of domestic violence in Rhode Island.

Member Agencies

The RICADV's five local domestic violence agencies provide a wide array of services for victims, including 24-hour hotline support, emergency shelter, support groups, counseling services, and assistance with the legal system. For more information about these organizations and services, call the statewide Helpline at 800-494-8100 or click here. If you hear or see someone being hurt, call 911 immediately.

 

Contact Details

422 Post Road, Suite 102
Warwick, RI 02888-1539

T (401) 467-9940

F (401) 467-9943