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  • Love is Respect!

    Love is Respect!

    February is national Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month. For information and ways to get involved, visit our Teen Center, or head over to loveisrespect.org, a leading national resource. We all have the ability to help someone experiencing dating violence. No one can do everything, but everyone can do something. Together, our collective actions can make a big difference. How will you play your part?
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  • Ten Men

    Ten Men

    Ten Men is an integral part of the RICADV's statewide plan to prevent intimate partner violence in Rhode Island. By engaging RI men as community leaders to become more knowledgeable, visible, and mobilized, we aim to change the harmful gender norms that perpetuate men’s violence against women and girls. #TenMenRI
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  • New Resource for RI

    New Resource for RI

    Now more than ever, people are becoming aware of and outraged by the harmful impacts of domestic violence. With primary prevention, we can stop the violence before it happens in the first place, before people ever become victims or perpetrators of abuse. To learn more, check out this new resource created by the RICADV!
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  • "The Way Home" Charm

    Alex and Ani has partnered with the RICADV and the National Network To End Domestic Violence to launch the CHARITY BY DESIGN charm bangle “The Way Home.” When you purchase your bracelets through the RICADV, 50% of the proceeds go toward supporting our work to end domestic violence in RI. You can purchase bracelets in person at the RICADV’s office in Warwick Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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  • Latino Communities

    Latino Communities

    Oprima el botón “Read More” para acceder a nuestro sitio web en Español.

    At the RICADV, we proactively engage Latino communities and work to raise awareness about the help that is available through our member agencies. Each agency offers diverse programs and services that include safety planning, court advocacy, shelter, and support groups. Immigration help is also available. Access our website in Spanish by clicking the "Read More" button below or En Español at the top of this page.

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The Newsroom

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Latest News

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Statement Regarding the Arraignment of Elaine Yates

By Deborah DeBare, Executive Director, Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence
 

[Providence, RI – January 18, 2017] In 1985, when Elaine Yates and her two daughters disappeared from their Warwick home, no laws against domestic violence existed in Rhode Island. It was not until 1988 that legislation went into effect making domestic violence a crime.

Prior to 1988, the landscape was much different for someone who was being battered in Rhode Island. Back then, it was not illegal for husbands to abuse their wives, and victims of abuse had no legal recourse. If a woman was being abused, she could not turn to law enforcement or the criminal justice system for help. There were very few options for safety, while crisis services and legal protections were practically nonexistent. It was not uncommon for victims of domestic violence to leave their homes with their children in order to stay safe, often going out of state and even changing their identities to protect themselves and their loved ones. At that time, advocates would often help battered women and their children flee to “underground” shelters, made up of a grassroots network of people’s homes and confidential community spaces. The stark reality was that the potential legal ramifications for victims who fled with their children were far outweighed by the risks and danger they might face if they stayed.

. . .

Read More: Latest News


NNEDV Applauds Obama Administration's Proposed Gun Violence Policies

NNEDV Urges that Domestic Violence Homicides Be Addressed

January 16, 2013 - The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) applauds the recommendations put forward today by President Obama and Vice President Biden in response to the devastating impact of gun violence. The very fact that the Administration has undertaken this initiative represents a significant step forward in making our country a safer place.

"This Administration cares deeply about both gun violence and violence against women," said Kim Gandy, President and CEO of NNEDV. "The incidence of domestic violence homicide sits squarely at the intersection of these two important policy priorities."

More than three women a day, on average, are killed by an intimate partner, and guns play a large role in the level of lethality. We know that access to firearms dramatically increases the risk of intimate partner homicide, compared to instances where there are no weapons, and that abusers who possess guns tend to inflict the most severe abuse on their partners. Congress and the Administration must support targeted, effective policies that respond to the crisis of domestic violence homicide.

"Domestic violence is not a tangential issue," said Gandy. "It must be interwoven into the overall response to gun violence. The protections and restrictions on guns announced today will reduce the risks for victims of domestic violence, indeed for all people, and we are grateful to the Obama Administration for putting them forward. There is also a need for specific policies that focus on the particular risk that guns pose to victims of domestic violence."

The president's call for universal background checks will make a particular impact on victims of domestic violence. The lifesaving Domestic Violence Offender Gun Ban already prohibits gun possession by those convicted of domestic abuse or who are subject to a domestic violence restraining order – indeed one study showed this restriction as the second most common reason for denial of handgun purchase applications. Yet many of those individuals have been able to access guns through private sale, on the Internet, or at a gun show, where background checks are not required, and the results have been devastating.

Legislation must close the private gun sale loophole, including Internet and gun show sales of firearms, and implement required background checks for all those seeking to purchase guns. This will dramatically reduce batterers' access to unregulated firearms.

There must also be increased federal support for consistent implementation of the Domestic Violence Offender Gun Ban. Limited resources at the state and local level have hampered the positive impact of this legislation, and federal resources are needed to ensure that it is applied fully, consistently and effectively. There must also be support and funding for domestic violence homicide reduction initiatives and lethality assessments, and prioritizing of best practices in the development of model policies and protocol for law enforcement agencies in responding to domestic violence homicides. These funding investments must be matched by investment in services, as victim service providers see increases in referrals as these initiatives are implemented.

Finally, in addition to congressional action on all of the president's recommendations, Congress must also act promptly to lift restrictions that have prevented research on gun violence prevention by the Center for Disease Control, the National Institutes of Health, and other agencies and partners.

"We should all be outraged over how many women are killed by gun violence. When abusers have access to firearms, victims are in grave danger," concluded Gandy.

Contact: Cindy Southworth, NNEDV, 202-543-5566 (o) or 202-431-2499 (m); communications@nnedv.org

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Domestic Violence and Firearms in Rhode Island

The high number of domestic violence deaths caused by firearms illustrates the extreme dangers that guns can bring to a home.  Nearly 50 percent of the 196 domestic violence deaths in Rhode Island since 1980 have been caused by firearms.  The presence of firearms greatly increases the danger not just for domestic violence victims, but also for bystanders – of the 33 domestic violence attacks on record resulting in multiple deaths, only 6 of those were not committed with guns and EVERY death of a child in those incidents was caused by a firearm.

RICADV has made many advances to address this very serious issue.  Two critical achievements are highlighted below:

The Homicide Prevention Act
RICADV successfully advocated for the passage of the Homicide Prevention Act that removes guns from domestic violence abusers with a restraining order against them.

Domestic Violence and Firearms: A Model Protocol
The purpose of this project was to develop a model policy for Rhode Island's law enforcement agencies to use when responding to domestic violence calls involving firearms.  Click here for the report.


Please click here for the Firearms Fact Sheet with additional statistics on the relationship between guns and domestic violence cases.


Contact: Cristina Williams, RICADV, (401) 467-9940 (o) or (917) 940-3729 (m); cristina@ricadv.org

Communications Center

  • Online Guide for Journalists +

    We work with statewide and local media to increase awareness about domestic violence, the services and resources available for people impacted by abuse, and the ways the community can get involved to help. Visit the RICADV's Online Guide for Journalists for best practices in covering domestic violence.
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  • Domestic Violence Awareness Month +

    We conduct statewide public awareness campaigns during October, national Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM), as a way to break the silence and stigma around domestic violence, raise up the voices and experiences of survivors, provide information about help and resources, and educate and engage our communities.
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Site Search

Teen Center

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Abusive relationships impact young people, too. Nearly 1 in 10 Rhode Island high schoolers has already experienced physical dating violence. Visit our Teen Center to find resources and information for young people in RI.

Spotlight

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Your abuser may monitor your Internet use and may be able to view your computer activity.

To immediately leave our site and redirect to a different site, click on the box to the bottom-right of our website or hit the ESC (Escape) key on the upper-left of your keyboard.

If you feel that your computer is not secure, use a computer in another location that your abuser cannot access.

For more information and tips for staying safe online and on your devices, click "Read More" to visit the Privacy & Technology section of our website.

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Looking to get involved in the movement to end domestic violence?

Sign up to join our mailing list, and receive mail and emails from the RICADV!

Visit our Calendar of Events to find local and online events.

AmazonSmile-webWhat is AmazonSmile?

AmazonSmile is a simple and automatic way for you to support the RICADV every time you shop, at no cost to you. When you shop at http://smile.amazon.com, you'll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to the RICADV.

On your first visit to AmazonSmile, you need to select a charitable organization to receive donations from eligible purchases before you begin shopping. Choose the RI Coalition Against Domestic Violence to support us. Amazon will remember your selection, and then every eligible purchase you make on AmazonSmile will result in a donation.

About the RICADV

The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence (RICADV) is an organization dedicated to ending domestic violence. Formed in 1979, the organization provides support to its member agencies, strives to create justice for victims, and provides leadership on the issue of domestic violence in Rhode Island.

Member Agencies

The RICADV's network of member agencies provide comprehensive services to victims, including emergency shelter, support groups, counseling, and assistance with the legal system. For more information about these organizations and services, call the statewide Helpline at 800-494-8100 or click here.

Contact

422 Post Road, Suite 102
Warwick, RI 02888-1539

T (401) 467-9940
F (401) 467-9943