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  • No More Silence

    No More Silence

    1 in 4 Rhode Islanders is a victim of abuse. They are our loved ones, neighbors, coworkers, and friends, and they are counting on us to make it our business. It is time for all of us to break the silence, learn about the warning signs, and help end domestic violence.
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  • Prevention is Possible

    Prevention is Possible

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, domestic violence is preventable. We can stop violence before it happens in the first place, before people ever become victims or perpetrators of abuse. To learn more, check out this prevention resource created by the RICADV!
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  • Ten Men

    Ten Men

    Ten Men is an integral part of the RICADV's statewide plan to prevent intimate partner violence in Rhode Island. By engaging male community leaders to become more knowledgeable, visible, and mobilized, we aim to change the harmful gender norms that perpetuate men’s violence against women and girls. #TenMenRI
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  • Paper Crane Bangle

    Paper Crane Bangle

    We are so excited to partner with ALEX AND ANI and the National Network to End Domestic Violence on the brand new "Paper Crane" Charity By Design bangle. When you purchase your bracelet through the RICADV, 50% of the proceeds go toward supporting our work to end domestic violence in RI. You can purchase bracelets in person at the RICADV’s office in Warwick Monday through Friday, 9 AM to 5 PM.
  • No Más Silencio

    No Más Silencio

    Para acceder a nuestro sitio web en Español: www.ricadv.org/es/ayuda-y-servicios

    We engage Latino communities in Rhode Island, translating our materials and building partnerships to help end domestic violence. We strive to raise awareness about the help that is available in our state for those impacted by abuse and the ways we can all get involved to end it.

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The Newsroom

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Latest News


Statement Regarding the Domestic Violence Homicide of Maniriho Nkinamubanzi

By Vanessa Volz, Executive Director, Sojourner House, and Deborah DeBare, Executive Director, Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence

[Providence, RI – Thursday, November 16, 2017] Our hearts go out to the family, friends, and community of Maniriho Nkinamubanzi, who was killed in Providence last Friday by her estranged husband, Bosco Tukamuhabwa. We grieve this tragic loss of life and extend our deepest condolences to all who have been impacted by this heinous crime, the fourth domestic violence homicide of 2017.

Maniriho was a refugee from the Congo, who was working to build a better life for herself and her family in Rhode Island. We are particularly devastated for Maniriho’s four children. No child should ever have to experience the loss of their mother through such tragedy or endure the suffering caused by violence in the home.

. . .

Read More: Latest News

Regarding the murder of Michelle Busby

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Friday, August 31, 2012
CONTACT: Reza Clifton, RICADV: (401) 467-9940, Cell: (401) 497-5246

Statement by Deborah DeBare, Executive Director of the Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Kristin Lyons, Executive Director of the Women's Center of Rhode Island

"First and foremost, our hearts go out to the family, friends and community of Michelle Busby.  Though not much has yet been released about her murder, her death is a stark reminder that we still have a long way to go to achieve a Rhode Island that is free of violence in the home and free of intimate partner violence."

"Domestic violence escalates to the point of murder because our system has failed to either keep a victim safe or hold an abuser accountable.  In the case of Ms. Busby's death, we know that the "person of interest," Andrew Jett, was arrested in 1992 and convicted and sentenced to 40 years in 1995 for the brutal beating murder of Stephanie Oxendine, his off-and-on girlfriend with whom he had two children.  What remains unclear is why he served so little time for the killing; records indicate that Mr. Jett was released on parole in 2010 after only serving 18 years."

"This gray area is part of a series of important questions that this case helps bring to the surface.   Why wasn't Mr. Jett's original charge documented as a domestic violence crime given the nature of the relationship between Mr. Jett and Ms. Oxendine – which clearly met the standards of the Domestic Violence Prevention Act?  What are the parole board's considerations when releasing the perpetrator of such a brutal act?  Did Mr. Jett have disciplinary infractions while incarcerated, and, if so, how did that impact his eligibility for being released early into the community?  There are also questions about the systems that were supposed to monitor Mr. Jett after he was released.   Was the State aware Mr. Jett was living with Ms. Busby (his residence should have been known as part of the supervision mandated for violent offenders)?  What are the standards for approving private community service options for violent criminals?"

"All too often, victims may be hesitant to contact the police for many reasons, including fears of retaliation from the abuser, insecurities about losing support from the abuser or developing guilt about the possibility of his/her incarceration.  In addition, victims may lack faith in the system when they see that people are let out early and are able to reoffend. That is why we are concerned about the policies carried out during the parole process and why we are calling for a thorough review of parole protocols and procedures.  In cases of domestic violence, we need systems to assess an abuser's dangerousness and prevent future instances."

"We question, in this case, what could have been done to keep the victim safe.  Leniency unfortunately sends the message to abusers that they will not be held accountable for their crimes, while simultaneously jeopardizing the safety of victims.  But we also recognize that eliminating violence against women demands a comprehensive and coordinated effort between elected and appointed officials, government and non-government organizations and agencies, community leaders, businesses, public organizations and private citizens.  The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence and its six member agencies are here to help through a wide array of services, including analysis and monitoring of the legal system, support groups, emergency shelters, and a 24-hour hotline to support victims and answer questions.  We urge all Rhode Islanders to remember that if they hear or see someone being hurt to call 911 immediately, and if they or someone they know needs support to call 800-494-8100."

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This statement has been updated to reflect the fact that, to date, Andrew Jett has been identified as a person of interest, and his recent arrest is tied to a parole violation.

Communications Center

  • Domestic Violence Awareness Month +

    We conduct statewide public awareness campaigns each October, National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, to keep the issue of domestic violence visible, provide information about community resources, and engage Rhode Islanders in helping to end abuse.
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  • Online Guide for Journalists +

    We work with the Rhode Island media to ensure that press coverage on domestic violence increases awareness about the issue, provides information about available resources, and engages the community to help end abuse. Visit the RICADV's Online Guide for Journalists for best practices on covering domestic violence.
    Read More
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Site Search

Teen Center

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Abusive relationships impact young people, too. Visit our Teen Center to find resources and information for young people in RI.

Spotlight

  • Be Tech Safe
  • News & Events
  • AmazonSmile
  • 35 Years of Progress

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Your abuser may monitor your Internet use and may be able to view your computer activity.

To immediately leave our site, click on the box at the bottom-right of our website or hit the ESC (Escape) key on the upper-left of your keyboard.

If you feel that your computer is not secure, use a computer in another location that your abuser cannot access.

For tips on how to use the Internet and technology safely if you are in an abusive situation, visit the Privacy & Technology section of our website.

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Do you want to help end domestic violence in your community?

Visit our Calendar of Events to find ways to get involved!

To stay up to date on the work we do and how you can play your part, sign up to receive RICADV emails.

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AmazonSmile-webWhat is AmazonSmile?

AmazonSmile is a simple and automatic way for you to support the RICADV every time you shop, at no cost to you. When you shop at http://smile.amazon.com, you'll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to the RICADV.

On your first visit to AmazonSmile, you need to select a charitable organization to receive donations from eligible purchases before you begin shopping. Choose the RI Coalition Against Domestic Violence to support us. Amazon will remember your selection, and then every eligible purchase you make on AmazonSmile will result in a donation.

Lisa Leslie Says No More35th Anniversary Celebration

In 2014, the RICADV celebrated 35 years of progress in advocating for victims and holding abusers accountable.

On October 9, during Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we commemorated this milestone with special guest Lisa Leslie, WNBA legend, four-time Olympic gold medalist, and supporter of the national NO MORE campaign against domestic violence.

We thank everyone who has played a part in helping us move our work forward. Together we can end domestic violence.

About the RICADV

The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence (RICADV) is an organization dedicated to ending domestic violence. We were formed in 1979 to support and assist the domestic violence agencies in Rhode Island. We provide leadership to our member agencies, strive to create justice for victims, and raise awareness on the issue of domestic violence in Rhode Island.

Member Agencies

Our network of member agencies provides comprehensive emergency and support services to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual violence, and stalking. Services include 24-hour hotline support, emergency shelter, support groups, counseling services, and assistance with the legal system. For more information, call the statewide Helpline at 800-494-8100 or click here.

Contact Details

422 Post Road, Suite 102
Warwick, RI 02888-1539

T (401) 467-9940

F (401) 467-9943


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